Reader Guest Post! Traditional Silesian “Šoldra”

Soldra.jpg
Today I have the pleasure of posting the first ever guest post here on Strictly Paleo…ish!
I was contacted by Mirek, a Czech reader of mine who also run the Czech Paleo blog “Metlův Paleo/Primal food blog“.
He was letting me know he wanted to give it a shot to post in English, and kindly asked if he could use my blog as the arena for it.
When someone want to challenge themselves for the better, of course I want to help out making that happen if I have the possibility to!
(Also, never forgetting all the great support I got from Russ Crandall when I first started out, I thought this would be a good way to pay some of that kindness forward.)

So, without much further ado, I hand the post over to Mirek to let him introduce himself and a share a recipe with you that is representative for his part of the world.
I hope you’ll enjoy it, and I would really appreciate you taking the time to give him some of that special love the Paleo community is so well known for in the comments section below.
Here we go:

First, some background on the recipe:
“Šoldra”, or “Muřin”, is traditional Silesian Easter recipe, most commonly prepared and eaten on Easter Sunday.
For me though, it is more related to Christmas time when family and friends were making it and we all enjoyed it together.

Silesia is an area that lies partially in the Czech republic (North-East corner), Poland (Eastern boarder) and Germany (a tiny part in the South-East), and today around 60.000 people consider themselves to be part of this nation in Poland alone.
As the people living there are part of the Slavs, they have their own language – something between regular Polish and old Czech.
In their language “Šoldra” means “Roll” or “Wrap”, and “Muřin” means “Blackened”.
Why it is called “Šoldra” is then quite obvious when looking at the pictures of the dish, but “Muřin” is not that obvious…it is simply because when it was made in wood heated bread-ovens it sometimes got a bit black on top…

The dish in it’s most basic form is just some sort of ham wrapped in a dough and baked in a oven.
Originally, and traditionally, it’s made with a puff pastry type of dough, and filled with different variations of sausages, e.g. white wine sausage (similar to Bavarian wurst), smoked meat sausages, ham/pork sausages etc.
For our purposes the traditional dough is in this recipe replaced with an almond meal based one, and for readers who does not have access to “white sausages”, I made an alternative option based on minced pork.

Soldra_Roll.jpg

The recipe:

Ingredients:
(Makes 1 roll, about 12 inch (30 cm) long)

• 1 tbsp Nut Oil.
• 2 Eggs.
• 1 cup (2.5dl) Almond Flour.
• 1/4 tsp of Baking Soda.
• 1/2 tsp of Salt.
• 2 slices of Ham.
• A bit of diced Bacon.
• 2 “White Sausages” or 9 oz (250g) Minced Pork.
Note: If using minced pork – season it with one small onion (finely chopped), spices (such as salt, pepper, chilli, whole black cumin, etc.), 2 cloves of garlic (minced) and 50 ml of red wine, and then let it sit for a while to allow the flavors to combine and “grow”.

How To:

Pre-heat oven to 335°F (170°C).Take one egg, and combine it with the almound flour and oil, then add the baking soda and salt and form a dough.Roll the dough between two parchment papers into something like 1/4 inch (0.5 cm) thick and a little bit more than 12 inches (30cm) wide.

Along the longest side of the flattened dough, place a bit in towards the center:
A) The mixture of minced meat, wine, spices, onion and garlic.
…or…
B) Diced bacon and thicker slices of ham and “white sausage”.

Carefully fold the dough over the filling, roll it up, and seal the ends (very important, so the juices stays inside the wrap instead of running out and soaking it from the outside).

Then take the second egg, beat it lightly and brush the top of the roll with it.
(Optional: You can also spread whole spices on top to enhance the experience.)

Bake in oven for 30-40 minutes until the crust is nicely brown.

Serve warm or cold.

Soldra_Meal.jpg

About Mirek:
I am 27, and started my Paleo journey in August last year and me and my girlfriend are eating only paleo since November 2012.
I am working on my own blog, focusing on recipes, but also post other information that might be useful for beginners as well as experienced paleoists.
My goal for now is to publish one recipe per day in my native language (Czech), until the content is strong enough and the blog is full of fresh ideas.
I’m currently studying Social Pedagogy in the university of Brno, the second largest city of Czech republic, focusing my bachelor thesis: a description of the Paleo/Primal subculture.

Get in contact with Mirek:
Blog (in Czech): “Metlův Paleo/Primal food blog
Twitter: @metliq
Pinterest: pinterest.com/metliq
Facebook: “MetluvBlog

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11 thoughts on “Reader Guest Post! Traditional Silesian “Šoldra”

  1. Wow, I am from Silesia myself (and of course, I read Metla’s blog – one of the few Czech paleo blogs and a great inspiration) but I didn’t know the worlds “šoldra” or “muřín” although I have already eaten it. Thank you for teaching me something new! Could you please correct “Selesian” to “Silesian” (also in the tags)?

    • Hi Jana!

      Omg! Can’t believe a type-o like that slipped through! :(
      I sincerely apologize, thanks for pointing it out!
      It’s already corrected in the post (but unfortunately I can’t change it in the URL as subscription mails linking to the post already have been sent out).
      Update: Also corrected it in the URL (old incorrect URL still works but redirects to the new, correct, one).

      Best regards
      // Peter

  2. Pingback: Reader Guest Post! Traditional Silesian “Šoldra” | Paleo Digest

  3. I love this post, especially the story and history behind the dish. I used to eat a similar dish when I was younger, but it was nowhere near as tasty as this one looks :)

  4. I’m so happy for Mirek to read all the wonderful and well deserved comments about this awesome recipe, “Paleo Love” really is a true thing! :)

    Thanks everyone, and keep ’em comin’!

    //Peter

  5. Pingback: What can you make with... | Mark's Daily Apple Health and Fitness Forum page

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